Social Media Policy for NGS 2010

Twitter

Thanks to Elizabeth Hansford of Genealogy Geek who sent us a photo (via Twitter of course!) of the social media policy in force at the National Genealogical Society’s Annual Conference going on right now in Salt Lake City:

NGS 2010 social media policy

Here is the transcription:

National Genealogical Society Social Media Policy
NGS does not permit the recording of presentations at the NGS Family History Conference under any circumstances or in any form or media, including but not limited to audio recordings, video recordings, or literal transcripts, except by specific written permission.
NGS does permit and encourage the use of social media, such as Facebook, Twitter and blogging at the conference as a way to summarize, highlight, exerpt, review, critique, and/or promote the presented materials, syllabus materials, or the conference in general, provided that (1) the material is not shared in full and (2) the author/speaker is referenced and cited appropriately in each case.  Please keep in mind that our presenters have invested many hours in the development of this material and copyright laws apply.

I want to congratulate the organizers of NGS 2010 for putting such a policy in place and for making certain that not only are the intellectual property rights of genealogy speakers protected, but that social media users feel safe in using the latest technologies to help promote the field of genealogy.

© 2010, copyright Thomas MacEntee

Print Friendly

This entry was posted in GeneaBloggers and tagged , by Thomas MacEntee. Bookmark the permalink.

About Thomas MacEntee

What happens when a “tech guy” with a love for history gets laid off during The Great Recession of 2008? You get Thomas MacEntee, a genealogy professional who’s also a blogger, educator, author, social media connector, online community builder and more. Thomas was laid off after a 25-year career in the information technology field, so he started his own genealogy-related business called High Definition Genealogy. He also created an online community of over 3,000 family history bloggers known as GeneaBloggers. His most recent endeavor, Hack Genealogy, is an attempt to “re-purpose today’s technology for tomorrow’s genealogy.” Thomas describes himself as a lifelong learner with a background in a multitude of topics who has finally figured out what he does best: teach, inspire, instigate, and serve as a curator and go-to-guy for concept nurturing and inspiration. Thomas is a big believer in success, and that we all succeed when we help each other find success.

Comments

Loading Facebook Comments ...
Loading Disqus Comments ...