May I Introduce To You . . . Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Heather Wilkinson Rojo

I have the wonderful pleasure of introducing you to Heather Wilkinson Rojo of the Nutfield Genealogy blog, “Local history and genealogy of Londonderry and Derry, New Hampshire, as well as personal genealogy stories and family history from Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Maine.”  Heather’s hometown: Londonderry, New Hampshire.

Heather has been involved in her family’s history for about 30 years now. Her genealogy journey started in her teenage years when Heather’s grandmother came to live with her family for a summer.

Heather’s grandmother came through Ellis Island and was a great storyteller. Heather loved to ask her about life in Yorkshire, England.  It was also the same year that Heather read the book “Roots.”

That Fall, Heather took a night class and started tracing her family history. One of the first lines Heather traced was her Munroe family of Lexington, Massachusetts.  She discovered all her ancestors and cousins who had fought in the Battle on Lexington Green, which was a great find for the Bicentennial year.  Heather would ride her bike to the American Antiquarian Society reading room in Worcester. It was there that she found a book on her Munroe family that went back to Scotland during the English Civil War.  The first Munroe had arrived as a Scots prisoner of war in 1650 and to be sold into servitude in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Heather’s Family and Her Blog

Heather’s family members were her first blog fans! Heather’s husband and mom read her blog just about every morning.  Other family members follow along from all over New England.

Heather’s husband’s family is from Spain and they enjoy reading her blog too, sending her emails regularly. Heather finds that this is a great way to maintain regular contact with cousins who live so far away; they always have more to tell and add to her stories and photographs.

How Heather Follows the Rest of Us

Heather has about a dozen blogs that she follows via Networked Blogs on Facebook. She does use a blog reader also. Many on her friends list on Facebook, also post their blogs on their wall, so it makes it easy for her to see the stories as soon as they post.

Heather follows about 20 blogs on her reader each day, and about 20 more on her list of favorite websites that she checks about twice a week. Knowing that not everyone posts new stories each day, makes it easier to follow and stay current on blog reading.

Heather’s Thoughts on Blogging

Heather started blogging by contributing stories to her local Londonderry News community blog. After a time, Heather decided to start her own blog.  By then, she wasn’t afraid to write or post stories; blogging came very natural to her.

Heather continues to send stories of local interest, genealogies on local families and famous New Hampshire people.

Heather’s one concern when she first started blogging was whether or not she would have enough stories to post on a daily basis on her own blog. Now, Heather posts almost everyday Monday thru Friday. She hasn’t run out of ideas yet. In Heather’s own words, “I have a list as long as my arm for upcoming stories!”  There are lots of interesting tales from her 30 years of researching to share.

Heather is currently the Captain of the New Hampshire Mayflower Society, a member of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, the Londonderry Historical Society and a volunteer for RAOGK

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Head on over to Heather’s blog and take a look around. Please leave a message letting her know you stopped by. Welcome Heather, it’s great to have you here.

© 2010, copyright Gini Webb

Gini Webb lives in San Diego, California and manages her own blog, Ginisology, while also researching her own German heritage, recently retired, enjoying life with wonderful husband Steve and visiting with her now seven grandchildren!

Are you a genealogy blogger who would like to be interviewed for the “May I Introduce To You . . .” series? If so, contact Gini Webb via e-mail.

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