New Genealogy Blogs June 30, 2012

new genealogy blogs

There are 5 newly-discovered genealogy and family-history related blogs that we’ve located this week. Remember to try and help out these new blogs by:

  • using any follow feature listed on the blog
  • adding them to your blog reader
  • adding a comment on their blog saying “hi” and “welcome”

Here are this week’s new listings:

bastians in texas

Bastians In Texas
http://bastiansintexas.blogspot.com
Blog type: Individual family history

I have been working on my family history off and on for about 12 years. My drive to find my roots stems from not having them as I grew up. I had bits and pieces of histories done by other family members that were passed on to me by my mother. Most of what I have does not have citations, so I do not know where the information came from. That has been the bulk of my genealogy research for most of those years.

For the past five years or so, I have focused on my paternal line. I do not have much information on them, and since my family was not close growing up, I do not have family members to ask. I have been building this tree mostly blind. My current sticking point is Charles Bastian, my great-grandfather. I do not know who his parents are, so going further back has been a challenge. I have two possible families that may be connected, and through future blog posts, I hope to work out which one (if either) is the right one.

milk and mettle

Milk and Mettle
http://milkandmettle.blogspot.com
Blog type: Individual family history, Wisconsin genealogy

My family were some of the original settlers of Walworth County, Wis. Join me as I delve into their history, complete with vintage photos, journals, letters, recipes, joys and struggles.

portals2history

Portals To History
http://www.portals2history.blogspot.com
Blog type:  Professional genealogist blog

Portals2history, an historical and genealogical research company was recently established by Judith Sweets.

Judith Sweets, researcher, historian, genealogist and author has conducted part-time independent genealogical and historical research for more than 25 years and for several years served as a volunteer researcher for her local genealogical society.

She has a Master’s Degree in Historical Administration and Museum Studies from the University of Kansas. During the past 20 years she held various professional museum and archive positions including Collection Manager, Registrar/Exhibit Coordinator, Reference Archivist, Audiovisual Archivist and Media and Exhibits Archivist. She has also taught several “Genealogy and the Internet” classes for the local High School Extension  program.

During the early 1980s she was the editor of “The Pioneer,” a publication of the Douglas County [Kansas] Genealogical Society.

Judith has a passion for historical and genealogical research. She enjoys finding ancestors for others and helping them fill in gaps on their family tree. Her specialties are newspaper research and census research. She also has expertise in Kansas historical research and African-American historical and genealogical research. While researching her own ancestry, she traveled to Ireland, England, Canada, Switzerland and France.

In 2006 Sweets compiled a book with Debby Lowery entitled African-Americans in the 1865 Kansas State Census [Douglas County]. In her free time she is conducting in-depth research about formerly enslaved African-Americans who rode the Underground Railroad through Kansas en route north in the late 1850s and early 1860s.

the house on redbud road

The House on Redbud Road
http://redbudhouse.blogspot.com
Blog type: Individual family history

“The Journey to Unravel the Lives of a Natchez/Cherokee Family.” This family can be found in the Louisiana and Miss territory, SC, NC, Alabama, and GA.

wikihome pages

wikiHomePages Blog
http://wikihomepages.wordpress.com
Blog type: Genealogy vendor blog

America is a nation on the move.  Literally.  The average person will live in 14 different homes during his or her lifetime, with around 40 million of us changing our address in any given year.  But wherever we go we take with us a life-long connection to the homes we leave behind.

wikiHomePages.com is a map-based photosharing website building a visual history of our homes, one address at a time, using photos and stories contributed by former residents, family members and the public.  Just as every person can have a Facebook page, we want to give every residential address its very own HomePage.

The website also contains links to articles about genealogy, the history of homes and the people who lived in them, along with ways to preserve our family photos and stories.  This blog is a place to post and further discuss the homes and articles found on wikiHomePages.com, as well as new topics and stories found only on the blog.

Thanks for dropping by.  I hope you’ll also check out wikiHomePages.com and add some photos and stories from the places near and dear to you and your family.  There really is no place like home.  Especially yours.

© 2012, copyright Thomas MacEntee

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About Thomas MacEntee

What happens when a “tech guy” with a love for history gets laid off during The Great Recession of 2008? You get Thomas MacEntee, a genealogy professional who’s also a blogger, educator, author, social media connector, online community builder and more. Thomas was laid off after a 25-year career in the information technology field, so he started his own genealogy-related business called High Definition Genealogy. He also created an online community of over 3,000 family history bloggers known as GeneaBloggers. His most recent endeavor, Hack Genealogy, is an attempt to “re-purpose today’s technology for tomorrow’s genealogy.” Thomas describes himself as a lifelong learner with a background in a multitude of topics who has finally figured out what he does best: teach, inspire, instigate, and serve as a curator and go-to-guy for concept nurturing and inspiration. Thomas is a big believer in success, and that we all succeed when we help each other find success.