New Genealogy Blogs July 24, 2010

new genealogy blogs

[Note: this is a regular feature of GeneaBloggers which highlights new genealogy and family history-related blogs as well as those recently discovered by members of GeneaBloggers. Use the Suggest A Blog! link in the menu bar to pass along information on new blogs.]

There are six newly-discovered genealogy and family-history related blogs that we’ve located this week for a total of 1,193 genealogy blogs on our list! Remember to try and help out these new blogs by:

- using the Follow feature if the blog is hosted on Blogger – adding them to your blog reader – adding a comment on their blog saying “hi” and “welcome”

Here are this week’s new listings:

bergits genealogy

Berit’s Adventures in Genealogy
http://saulsancestry.blogspot.com
Blog type: Individual family history, Jewish genealogy

This is my place to post my current research findings and challenges, changes to my genealogy website, and any other genealogical information that I find.

calling all cousins

Calling All Cousins
http://callingallcousins-cshultz.blogspot.com
Blog type: Individual family history

I am the family historian. I declared this title in 1998, around the time that Genealogy and research were starting to make the news. Yes, I caught the bug from a magazine article. It was a tiny little paragraph, I think now, about Cyndi’s List. And it’s led me on a wonderful adventure so far, including finding cousins and discovering family I never knew about. A bunch of research trips and many an hour researching online and still, I am fascinated by the puzzle. It’s a crazy, mixed up kind of puzzle and every little piece found gives me immense satisfaction and a joyful zing in my heart.

from out of the top hat

From Out of the Top Hat
http://www.alplm.org/blog/
Blog type: Genealogy library blog, Illinois genealogy, Midwest genealogy

A cartoon shows Abraham Lincoln looking askance at a book with the caption: “My God, another book.” The reference assumes the reader knows that there are quite a few Lincoln books, roughly 17,000 titles to date. The same exasperation might be expressed as: “My God, another Lincoln blog.” There are quite a number of blogs, active and inactive, regarding Lincoln and the Civil War. Why is another needed? The simple answer is that whereas most blogs are the creation and expressions of individual opinion, this blog is institutionally based and serves a broad purpose. By tapping into the collections of the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, the blog hopes to tease out meanings about Lincoln, his times, and his legacy.

The bloggers for this site are Dr. James M. Cornelius, Lincoln Curator, Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum; Professor Richard Wightman Fox, Department of History, University of Southern California; and Dr. Thomas F. Schwartz, Illinois State Historian, Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum. Some of the entries will be serious and others whimsical, but it is hoped that all will offer something of interest.

genes reunited blog

Genes Reunited Blog
http://blog.genesreunited.co.uk
Blog type: Genealogy vendor blog, UK genealogy

Genes Reunited was launched in 2003 as a sister-site to Friends Reunited. Since then it has grown to become one of the UK’s largest family history websites. It marked a revolution in genealogy by combining historical records with social-networking. Members build their family tree by posting it on the site and investigating which ancestors they share with other members.

We currently have over 10 million members worldwide and over 650 million names listed on the site. One new name is added to the site every single second!

papers and dust

Papers and Dust
http://papiers.poussieres.free.fr/
Blog type: French genealogy, Genealogy industry blog

Information (in French) on French genealogy and the genealogy industry.

writing a family history

Writing a Family History
http://skfamilyhistory.blogspot.com
Blog type: Indian genealogy, Individual family history

I am a University of Chicago student who has taken the summer to study my family’s history. Fueled by a passion for social history and the University of Chicago’s Seidel grant, I have come to Chennai, India, to understand my family’s history in the 20th century.

What do I mean by family history? As a history student, I have always been interested in social history. A central question in social history, including the study of families, is how long-term social and political developments change our everyday lives. These long-term developments include urbanization, industrialization, the rise of the professions, and the spread of higher education, especially for women. Our homes and our families and our relationships with our loved ones are deeply affected by these developments (and, of course, our family lives and personal relationships in turn impact on society and politics, but that is a different project). The question is, what is the relationship between our experiences as members of a family and these larger social developments? My purpose in taking on this project is to understand what changes my family underwent—in terms of structure, living arrangements, and individuals’ identities—in the 20th century, and how the results of those changes were perceived by the members of my family.

© 2010, copyright Thomas MacEntee

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About Thomas MacEntee

What happens when a “tech guy” with a love for history gets laid off during The Great Recession of 2008? You get Thomas MacEntee, a genealogy professional who’s also a blogger, educator, author, social media connector, online community builder and more. Thomas was laid off after a 25-year career in the information technology field, so he started his own genealogy-related business called High Definition Genealogy. He also created an online community of over 3,000 family history bloggers known as GeneaBloggers. His most recent endeavor, Hack Genealogy, is an attempt to “re-purpose today’s technology for tomorrow’s genealogy.” Thomas describes himself as a lifelong learner with a background in a multitude of topics who has finally figured out what he does best: teach, inspire, instigate, and serve as a curator and go-to-guy for concept nurturing and inspiration. Thomas is a big believer in success, and that we all succeed when we help each other find success.

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