New Genealogy Blogs April 16, 2011

new genealogy blogs

[Editor's Note: this is a regular feature of GeneaBloggers which highlights new genealogy and family history-related blogs as well as those recently discovered by members of GeneaBloggers. Use the Suggest A Blog! link in the menu bar to pass along information on new blogs.]

There are 13 newly-discovered genealogy and family-history related blogs that we’ve located this week for a total of 1857 genealogy blogs on our list! Remember to try and help out these new blogs by:

  • using the Follow feature if the blog is hosted on Blogger
  • adding them to your blog reader
  • adding a comment on their blog saying “hi” and “welcome”

Here are this week’s new listings:

bogs and brooklyn

Bogs and Brooklyn
http://kerriecurtin.blogspot.com
Blog type: Individual family history

I am a lucky girl. Not just because of stuff like chocolate. I am a lucky girl because  I am a Curtin. Those who share my last name descend from a relatively small part of Ireland split between County Kerry  County Cork and County Limmerick < with  a few straglers from Clare>. There is even a Curtin website.

My great grandfather Denis Curtin came to America between 1895 and 1899. He met and married Margaret Cain. Together they had seven children Cornelius , Margaret, Patrick, William, Michael, Annie, and James. Denis was a street railway repairman. This was his second marriage. The first was to unknown Donegan. They had a child Joan. Both passed away in a “crash” . I have no idea what kind of “crash”.

I probably know more about my family history than the average person new to genealogy. I know that most of it starts in Brooklyn and ends in Ireland-Germany-Russia-Austria-Holland. I know that despite the fact that I cannot find a single non-celtic name within my Irish history I am certain I am Scandanavian.

Mostly, right now I am certain its time for chocolate.

broviak family blog

Broviak Family Blog
http://www.borowiakfamily.com
Blog type: Individual family history

This site has been set up to help with sharing family information and resources related to the genealogical study of our family’s ancestry. You are welcome to use the information you find; however, I ask that you reference the site as a source as I have endeavored to do with the information I have collected. I have tried to do my best to verify the information with valid sources, but there have been cases where some sources disagree or are not solid. I have tried to indicate when this is the case.

Please let me know if you find any errors or corrections. As always, it is a work in progress!

family history lineagekeeper

Family History with the Lineagekeeper
http://www.famhist.us
Blog type: Genealogy industry blog, Individual family history

Family history research is a favored avenue of relaxation. It is a Sherlock-like activity that can continue almost anywhere at any time. By leveraging a lifetime involvement in technology, my research efforts have resulted in terabytes of ancestral data, earning me the moniker of Lineagekeeper. And yes – We are all related to Royalty.

franco-american gravy

Franco American Gravy: Stories from Québec to Cohoes, New York
http://francoamericangravy.blogspot.com
Blog type: Individual family history

Stories of places, ancestors, family, and godparents who lived in Cohoes (textile and garment workers, butchers and barbers), Northside – Waterford (canalers), Whitehall (farmers and canalers), Port Henry (iron miners and Civil War soldiers), Champlain (canalers and farmers) and other towns along the Champlain Canal in New York State with some diversions to the places they emigrated from….Quebec (landless farmers, shoemakers, sailors, soldiers), old France, Acadia, and even Cornwall, England.

mckee genealogy

McKee Genealogy
http://mckeegenealogy.tumblr.com
Blog type: Individual family history

My branch of the McKee family came from Donegal, Ireland to Peterborough, Canada and then to Marysville, Kansas. I have had the great fortune of inheriting much of the McKee history and lineage information from my father Kevin McKee who has been researching our family’s history for over 20 years.

This Web-Site is dedicated to researching and sharing all things McKee.

patching my family together

Patching My Family Together
http://patchingmyfamilykin.wordpress.com
Blog type: Individual Family History

What am I doing here?  OHHHHH myyyy gawddddd……Can I learn how to blog? I hear it’s the raging thing now on the internet and for years I fought it as I pulled out my hair while trying to put java and html and anything else I could put together to make music pages.  So, now I am ready to take the easy way out and try to make some sense out of my family!!  I have been searching for years for information on my father’s parents – been thru many computers – many genealogy programs – and websites and still have not been able to find them soooooo I am going to attempt to go thru the census for the whole state of Texas starting with Bexar, Comanche, and surrounding counties and will provide information on the McGlothlin and Alderete families as I find them on the census.  An in between times…. I may ramble and rant and rave and git down in da floor and laugh my hiney off for no particular reason – Am I crazy?  Maybe so but this will be one heck of an adventure!!

philadelphia genealogy

Philadelphia Genealogy
http://www.pdqresearch.com/philadelphia-genealogy-blog/
Blog type: Pennsylvania genealogy

I’ve been playing around with a website and a blog about Philadelphia and local genealogical resources for a while. My earlier website was very business-like; a tool, strictly for the promotion of my business, PDQ Research. The blog was informal little tidbits about Philadelphia, local history, repositories, and nice places to eat lunch. I wasn’t pleased with either of them. The way the website was set up, I couldn’t do what I want to do, which was to help genealogists, family historians, investigatory companies navigate Philadelphia’s frustrating public record maze. The blog was too limited, also. What I wanted was to bring both together. I wanted to create a one-stop place that would help anyone trying to access Philadelphia records, using links, lists, stories, maps, photographs and local biographies. I wanted to create a site that I would use myself.

Here I go again. With the latest release of WordPress, I think I’ve found the best platform for my vision, a web-hosted “super-blog”. Now, I just have to build it. As I sit here writing this, I can visualize the site, but, also, I see the work and time it will take. So, if you happen by in the early stages, be patient, take the time to offer any suggestions and bookmark the site to return later.

the new genealogist

The New Genealogist
http://thenewgenealogist.blogspot.com
Blog type: Individual family history

When I began family history research about a year ago, I had no idea what I was getting myself into.  Genealogy can be time-consuming, especially when you’re hot on the trail of an elusive ancestor, but it is also rewarding.  You learn not only about yourself, but also about the history of communities, connections between family and friends, and just how hard life could be “back in the day.”  Sometimes you uncover an exciting fact, like your ancestor was a founding member of a colonial settlement or lived in a place you’ve always wanted to visit.  Other times you learn the hard truths of certain eras, such as when tragedy strikes a family.  Family history research is often an emotional rollercoaster, so be prepared.

I have no idea what I’m getting myself into with this blog.  I hope to share with avid learners the invaluable techniques I’ve picked up through my research.  No, I am not the most experienced researcher out there, by far.  However, I have devoted an enormous amount of time to this hobby, and I’ve learned a lot along the way.  As for blogging, I am a beginner, and I’m looking forward to this new journey, which I hope will help you in your research.

For now, I leave you with the following piece of advice I was given by a role model of mine:  always be skeptical.  Unless you can verify a name, date, place, or other fact with more than one source, do not assume it is true.  For example, I’ve seen one family tree after another follow the wrong individual’s lineage.  Q: How did this happen?  A: Copying others’ work without first verifying the information on one’s own.  You’re busy, I get it.  Take your time anyway.  Your ancestors aren’t going anywhere, and there’s no grand prize for compiling the largest family tree the fastest (at least to my knowledge).  The time you spend making sure everything is “correct” (an incredibly relative term in genealogy) will be worth it.

stories from many moons ago

Stories from Many Moons Ago
http://storiesfrommanymoonsago.blogspot.com
Blog type: Individual family history, Scottish genealogy, UK genealogy

A mum to 4 wonderful kids( well not so much kids these days), the youngest of whom has aspergers syndrome. From Scotland but been living in England for past 10 years, still get homesick a lot. I have a gorgeous 2 year old grandson but still feel way too young to be a gran though lol. I am addicted to genealogy, or as my family call it “collecting dead people”.

the researching archivist

The Researching Archivist
http://genealogyresearchservice.blogspot.com
Blog type: Individual family history, Missouri genealogy, Professional genealogist

I am a genealogist and archivist providing research services ranging from record lookup and multi-generational research to preparing papers for lineage societies.

I started this blog as a way to keep my business researching genealogy for clients. I previously completed research through the soon to be closed Expert Connect feature on Ancestry.com, where I maintained a five star rating through 38 projects. I have completed research projects based in various localities for clients all over the United States and the United Kingdom.

As I’m sure many people will begin an interest in Genealogy with a new season of Who Do You Think You Are about to appear on our tv screens, I welcome projects from the long time genealogist with a brick wall to new people just starting to research their family history.

up in the tree

Up In The Tree
http://www.upinthetree.blogspot.com
Blog type: Individual Family History

I am a stay at home mom and part time family history sleuth. I love the hunt to find out everything I can about my ancestors and their lives. The thrill of finding new information is addicting!

what's my lineage

What’s My Lineage? Confessions of a Genealogy Junkie
http://whatsmylineage.blogspot.com
Blog type: Individual family history

I first started doing genealogy as a senior in High School – many years before the internet. I spent many hours in cemeteries, courthouses and libraries. I still enjoy traveling to those locations, but I also enjoy using the internet and its ever expanding resources for my research. I joined the DAR over 30 years ago. I had to put my genealogy on hold for school and family, but I’ve been involved again for the past 15 years. Since then, I have discovered that I enjoy my memberships in the DAR as well as other lineage groups. Each group has its own “flavor”. I thoroughly enjoy the friendships I’ve made through membership in these groups. I spend my “free time” (that is, when I’m not working at my “real job”) working on my lineage, and helping others with their lineage.

willard family history

Willard Family History Blog
http://willardfamilyhistory.blogspot.com
Blog type: Individual family history

The story of this Willard clan began in the year 1800 when Dustin Bellfield was born in what is today Washington County, Vermont.  Nothing is known of his early life or who his parents were, but by 1823 he had migrated to Louisiana. By 1826 he had moved to Mississippi.  There he married Nancy Rachel Curry and raised a family of six children.  The family flourished and had a colorful history rooted in the Deep South.  They suffered poverty, family issues, war, plagues and famines.  It is a story of perseverance and a life-long struggle to live and survive in the rural south.  It is a story of people dealing with the gritty everyday issues of slavery in both pre and post Civil War years.

© 2011, copyright Thomas MacEntee

Print Friendly
Send to Kindle