New Genealogy Blogs 1 February 2014

Newly-Discovered Genealogy Blogs at GeneaBloggers

There are 4 newly-discovered genealogy and family-history related blogs that we’ve located this week. Remember to try and help out these new blogs by:

  • using any follow feature listed on the blog
  • adding them to your blog reader
  • adding a comment on their blog saying “hi” and “welcome”

Here are this week’s new listings:

a distant view

A Distant View
http://robertstoy.com/genblog/
Blog type: Research

This blog is mostly a discussion of genealogy research, with a focus on process and methodology.  I’ll occasionally jump into related areas such as software or technology or, who knows, something further afield. My target audience is intermediate or transitional genealogists and those terms deserve a blog of their own.  This is my attempt to point in the direction of sound research techniques and avoid the pitfalls of bad habits or just plain careless research.  Not everyone will be interested but if a person wishes to be a professional, or at least work like a professional, then perhaps there will be ideas here that can help.  The opinions are my own and I receive no compensation and take no advertisements for this site.

My background is in aerospace and medical research with an extended period of time teaching at a university.  I’ve written on product development methodology as well as quality improvement processes in for-profit companies, and moved into researching my own family history some 15 years ago.  The easy part of the history is done and I’m well into the hard part – the pre-1800 people where records become scarce, the women who have almost no records, the ancestors that seem to have no parents and appeared magically in colonial America.  In the past, I’ve worked with clients on their family research but no longer engage in this area – I just write about what is interesting.

Earlier Years

Earlier Years
http://earlieryears.blogspot.com.au/
Blog type: Australia, Australian, Family

This blog is my memorial to my parents, Hannah and Eddie Horgan, their ancestors and many relatives who have wandered this earth in earlier years.

This is my way of sharing stories and things I found regarding those ancestors:  newspaper articles, pictures, obituaries, tombstones and other records.

I have retired from many years of paid work as a teacher and librarian and now enjoy extra leisure time with my husband. As well as reading, sewing and researching folks of interest related to me from the early days of South Australia, I enjoy supporting my local library.

My other blog at Library Currants covers my reading and computer interests. The page graphics on this blog have been made in the Noteography app a recent acquisition on my ipad.

family puzzle pieces

Family Puzzle Pieces
http://familypuzzlepieces.blogspot.com
Blog type: Family

As I was setting up this blog site, coming up with a name was very easy. Genealogy is very much like a puzzle. Researching a family you never get the whole picture at once. As we look thru old family photos we get pieces. As we go thru the family bible we find names and dates–more pieces. As we begin go ask questions and interview family members–more pieces. As we begin to travel to cemeteries, libraries, and court houses . . . there are several more pieces. Not until we sit down and begin to enter the information into our computer program of choice….not until we hunt down as much information as we can  possibly cull from the census…not until we fill out the timeline of a family or begin to write their story do we have the full picture.

When my husband and I first started dating we would put puzzles together as funds we few. To this day at Thanksgiving or Christmas family get-togethers someone usually breaks out a Charles Wysocki puzzle to start assembling. It’s always a good way to get several family members around a table to start talking about memories and good times. Most times the puzzle isn’t totally completed before everyone has to leave but the memories are and a new generation has learned that life can be fun without cell phones, I-Pods and video games.

For almost a year now I have been hunting down puzzle pieces, and very early on I realized I probably won’t find all of them, and I won’t be able to finish the big picture of the past, but that’s ok. I just look at the picture of my family today and it’s wonderful.

HistoryGeo

HistoryGeo
http://blog.historygeo.com
Blog type: Geography, Maps, Vendor

HistoryGeo.com is a service of Arphax Publishing Co., a critically acclaimed publisher of reference tools for historians and genealogists.

This blog serves two purposes:

  • To entertain and educate with interesting historical, biographical, and genealogical findings, usually with a strong emphasis on the PLACES behind the events and people involved. These posts will often involve well-known public figures and/or their ancestors, including celebrities, political figures, criminals, and others. Other subjects will include findings made via the tools at HistoryGeo.com and we welcome submissions from our users, for possible inclusion in future articles (email address is below).
  • To inform people of new content and research tools available from HistoryGeo.com, as well as instructional material (or links to instructional videos, etc.)

Most, if not all research-related blog posts will include both free links to source materials and subscriber-only links that users of HistoryGeo.com can use to directly navigate to underlying maps that relate to the article.

© 2014, copyright Thomas MacEntee

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About Thomas MacEntee

What happens when a “tech guy” with a love for history gets laid off during The Great Recession of 2008? You get Thomas MacEntee, a genealogy professional who’s also a blogger, educator, author, social media connector, online community builder and more. Thomas was laid off after a 25-year career in the information technology field, so he started his own genealogy-related business called High Definition Genealogy. He also created an online community of over 3,000 family history bloggers known as GeneaBloggers. His most recent endeavor, Hack Genealogy, is an attempt to “re-purpose today’s technology for tomorrow’s genealogy.” Thomas describes himself as a lifelong learner with a background in a multitude of topics who has finally figured out what he does best: teach, inspire, instigate, and serve as a curator and go-to-guy for concept nurturing and inspiration. Thomas is a big believer in success, and that we all succeed when we help each other find success.